Principal's Message

Message from the Principal: Brother Eric Ali-- When guiding our children toward proper Islamic character, we must remember that part of being a wise teacher or parent is being kind and gentle with our children. During the time of the Prophet (saw), a Bedouin urinated in the masjid. Immediately the Prophet’s companions rushed toward the man to beat him. But the Prophet (saw) told them to leave him alone. After the man finished urinating, the Prophet (saw) told him, “Verily, filth and urine are not permitted in these masjids. Indeed, it is for the remembrance of Allah.” The Messenger said to his companions, “I was sent to make things easy, and I was not sent to make things difficult.” And he poured a bucket of water over the urine. Even though our children were raised in Islam, eventually they will have to choose to be Muslims. Let’s help make the proper decision easy for them.-- Al-Madinah School: 1635 South Saint Andrews Place, Los Angeles, California 90019-- madina@pacbell.net (1-323) 296-5961

Monday, November 20, 2017

5 Ways to Show Your Love with Your Time By Grandma Jeddah

5 Ways to Show Your Love with Your Time
By
Grandma Jeddah


It is related that the Prophet (saw) said:"All of you are shepherds, and each one is responsible for his flock. A leader is a shepherd and he is responsible for those in his care. A man is a shepherd over his family, and he is responsible for his flock. A woman is like a shepherd over her husband's house and children, and she is responsible for them. And a slave is a guardian of his master's property and is responsible for it. So all of you are guardians and are responsible for your charges." Al- Bukhari and Muslim.
            We don’t often experience the sight of shepherds guiding their sheep across a meadow to graze. But anyone who has seen the image of a young man with staff in hand and a flock of sheep trailing behind can attest to the fact that the proper maintenance of one’s flock necessities the spending of time.

            Spending productive time with our children is essential to raising them up properly. Here are five tips on how mothers can be more productive when spending time with their kids.
1.         Talk to your child. Mothers have a myriad of responsibilities to perform throughout the day. We prepare meals, wash and fold laundry, clean the house, transport to and from school, and the list goes on and on. During some of these activities, however, we have the opportunity to do a bit of multi-tasking and connect with our kids.

            The next time you pick up your daughter from school and commute back home, ask her about how her day went in school, who her best friends are, or who her favorite teacher is. Back at home while folding the clothes or putting the dishes away, discuss with your young one what you accomplished during the day and what still remains to be done.

            Make it a point to be accessible to your child when she approaches you with a concern that she has. Of course, during your daily routine of chores and errands, you won’t always be able or willing to provide your child with attentive conversation. Do the best you can. And do make a conscious effort to meet your child eye to eye to show your interest.

            When your child approaches you during the day to tell you about something important that’s on her mind, use that as an opportunity to carry the conversation further and instill some of your values . . . or, to simply lend an affectionate ear.

2.         Listen to your child. Take the time to sincerely listen to your child express her complaints, concerns, and happy moments. This helps build a needed bond between you and your young one. Children need to feel they have a significant other who is concerned about their needs, wants and problems.   Showing concern for your child’s emotional state helps her develop healthy social skills for interacting with others around her.

3.         Take your child on outings. Spending time with your child away from home needn’t require much planning, time or money. The places to take her are endless: Take her on a short excursion with you to the mail box at the street corner to deliver a letter. This will help her develop a greater understanding of the postal process—but more importantly, it will show that you enjoy her company. Let her join you on your trip to the gas station to pump gas in the car. Take her along with you to go shopping for groceries. Discover new things at the museum. Enjoy a walk to the park or playtime at the playground. Take a stroll through the mall.  You are your child’s center of attention; let your little one know you desire being around her, as well.

4.         Discipline respectfully and kindly. When you correct your child for misbehavior, be gentle in doing so. It is reported that The Prophet (saw) said, "O Ayisha! There is nothing that has gentleness in it except that it beautifies it, and it is not taken away from anything except that it defiles it. (Muslim).  Often times, a gentle approach of explaining to your child her error is sufficient. Better yet, reward her for the times she behaves appropriately.  When she remembers to take her bath without a reminder, let her know you are pleased by giving her a special hug or kiss. When she shares with her younger sibling, tell her Allah likes that type of behavior and let her have extra time on the computer before bedtime. Your daughter will learn that even though she isn’t perfect, she does have positive aspects about her behavior. This feeling of accomplishment will spur further appropriate conduct in the future, insha’Allah.

5.         Be patient with your child. Allah says in Quran, "And verily, whosoever shows patience and forgives, that would truly be from the things recommended by Allah.'' (42:43)
            Remaining patient with your child’s short comings is an honorable act that you should strive to make a habit of. When you refrain from saying hurtful words and avoid lashing out angrily when your child misbehaves, you present a living example for your child to model after. One of the primary ways we teach our children is through example. When they observe how we handle difficult situations, they learn how they should handle them, too.

            All of these tips on how to spend productive time with your child necessitate being there for them. Quality time is important, but quantity time is as well. Being a shepherd is an enormous responsibility. Make a conscious effort to spend productive time with your child regularly. On the Day of Judgment we will be asked about how we spent our time. Spending it productively on our children is a valuable way to get blessings from Allah, insha’Allah, and a wonderful way to maintain our flock.

Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 16 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California. She has written dozens of parenting articles for Muslim magazines, newspapers and blogs.  She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Buy her e-book now at:  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/







Grandma Jeddah's Bi-Monthly Newsletter (Are You Mentally Ready for Disciplining?)


Assalamu Alaikum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatu 
  
We hope you enjoyed and benefited from reading the first issue of Grandma Jeddah's bi-monthly parenting newsletter in September about our special needs children. This month’s newsletter is about making sure we are in the proper state of mind when disciplining. If you would like a PDF copy or would like us to mail you several copies for your school or organization, please email us at: info@grandmajeddah.com

Please feel welcome to share our bi-monthly newsletter with friends, family, and staff. You are more than welcome to make extra copies. It would be our pleasure to send additional copies at your request.

Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 16 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California. She has written dozens of parenting articles for Muslim magazines, newspapers and blogs.  She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Buy her e-book now at:  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/


Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor By Grandma Jeddah (part 4)

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor
By

Grandma Jeddah


(part 4)

Another benefit of the Islamic stipulations requiring that the child know of his true ancestry, and retain the name of his biological parents is that it helps prevent the child from inadvertently marrying his sibling or those relatives unlawful for marrying.   This type of situation occurring is not unheard of.  It can be utterly devastating, as would be expected, for both parties involved once the truth becomes known.

The conditions of adoption set forth in Islam allow for a more effective and productive adoption process for all parties involved. An effective system for adoption is important, because taking care of orphans is an honorable act in which Muslims are encouraged to participate and where many blessings can be found. The following hadith speaks volumes of the enormous reward those who take care of orphans will receive, insha’Allah:

The Prophet (saw) said, “I and the one who takes care of an orphan will enter Paradise together.” Then he joined his index and middle finger together.  (Bukhari)

A noble endeavor indeed!

Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 16 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California. She has written dozens of parenting articles for Muslim magazines, newspapers and blogs.  She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Buy her e-book now at:  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/




Saturday, October 28, 2017

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Sunday October 28 to Sunday November 5th
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Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor By Grandma Jeddah (part 3)

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor
By

Grandma Jeddah
(part 3)

These stipulations presented in Islam are truly from Allah the Most High—The Knower of the inner recesses of the heart . . . Allah who created everything and who knows everything.

Man’s inferior laws are in no way comparable to Allah’s perfect wisdom. It is now becoming more and more apparent to those working in the professional spheres of child welfare that preventing adopted children from knowing their true origin can be counterproductive for the child. Of late, there has been an influx of adopted children seeking information surrounding their birth parents and the particulars of their adoption.

Adopted children who have been informed they were adopted have a natural tendency to want to know more about their birth parents. This desire to know more does not in any manner or fashion minimize the love these children have for their adoptive parents. It is merely a tendency that naturally exists within the person. This innate desire to identify one’s biological origins is known to Allah, who created each individual. And truly, He knows the nature of His creation.


Numerous stories abound of children who were not informed of their adoption early on and later became aware of it felt betrayed by their adoptive parents and completely confused about their identity. Islam ensures adopted children are informed of their adoption.  This is truly a mercy from Allah, The Most High. It helps to alleviate some of the problems that may be inherent in adoption.

(to be continued, insha'Allah)



Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 16 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California. She has written dozens of parenting articles for Muslim magazines, newspapers and blogs.  She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-books at:  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/



Saturday, October 21, 2017

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor By Grandma Jeddah (part 2)

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor
By

Grandma Jeddah
(part 2)

Allah also says in Quran, “Therefore, treat not the orphan with harshness.” (Quran 94: 9)
He commands us to: “Worship none but Allah (Alone) and be dutiful and good to parents, and to kindred, and to orphans . . .”
These verses from Quran present clear evidence that orphans should be treated honorably and respectably.

Adoption, in both Islam and the West, involves raising and maintaining a child which is not the caregiver’s offspring. However, Islam provides additional stipulations, unlike the West, that provide added protection for the adopted child. One requirement of adoption in Islam is that the child should be made aware that the adoptive parents are not his biological parents. Another is that the orphan retains the name of his parent(s).
Allah says in Quran about adopted children: “. . . Nor has He made your adopted sons your real sons. That is but a saying with your mouths. But Allah says the truth and he guides to the right way.”  (Quran33:4)

“ .  . . Call them by the names of their fathers, that is more just in the sight of Allah, but if you do not know their father’s names, (then they are) your brothers in faith, or your wards. But there is no blame on you if you make a mistake there in: What counts is the intention of your hearts. (Quran 33:5)


(to be continued, insha'Allah)



Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 16 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California. She has written dozens of articles for Muslim magazines, newspapers and blogs.  She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-books at:  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/



Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor By Grandma Jeddah

Rose Ali                                                                                  Words:  Approx. 900
1636 S. St. Andrews Pl. #4
Los Angeles, CA, 90019
(323) 900-9837
info@grandmajeddah.com




Adopting Orphans: A Noble Endeavor
By
Grandma Jeddah
Do you know anyone who was adopted or raised in a home other than his biological parents? Sure you do . . . three of them are mentioned in the Quran—Prophet Musa (as), Prophet Yusuf (as), and Prophet Muhammad (saw). Prophet Muhammad (saw) and Prophet Musa (as) were orphans, while Prophet Yusuf (as) was abandoned. Evidence shows that adoptions have taken place since early historical times. The need for others to support and maintain children not born of their loin or womb existed thousands upon thousands of years ago and still exists today.

In the West, during the early 1900’s, one of the primary ways in which adoption was practiced was as a solution for mothers who had become pregnant out of wedlock, similar to how abortions are primarily used today.

Because societal regulations during that period sought to protect birth parents and adopted children from the stigma related to an unmarried mother having a child, adoption was and still remains today, a taboo subject, often shrouded in secrecy and shame. Allah, however, presents a different perspective regarding orphans and adoption. He bestows upon adopted orphans honor, dignity and justice, and demands that others do so, likewise. Allah says in Quran: Those who swallow the property of the orphans unjustly are actually devouring fire into their bellies and they shall enter the burning fire.”(Quran 33:4-5)

(to be continued, insha'Allah)


Grandma Jeddah is the mother of 11 children and 16 grandchildren. She has taught hundreds of students for over 30 years at an Islamic school in Los Angeles, California. She has written dozens of articles for Muslim magazines, newspapers and blogs.  She is the author of, Discipline without Disrespecting: Discover the Hidden Secrets of How to Effectively Discipline Your Muslim Child--And Keep Your Peace of Mind while at It.  Order her e-books at:  http://www.grandmajeddah.com/